Saturday, October 6, 2012

The labryinth...the maze...


I don't know from where to start. This is about one verse from a poem, that I happen to know by heart almost three years ago (the verse not the poem). I came across the verse the first time when it was written in one friend's status on Facebook.

The verse literally says and that is my translation:
Whoever you love would be bewitched/ So choose whoever you wish to love.

For a long time, it has confused me whether 'you' in the line refers to the lover himself or the one he loves? In other words, was he confidently saying to himself that I know you will bewitch anyone you love, or was he addressing her/him/his beloved telling her/him that go and do love whoever you want ? The first one is a call on freedom really; the second is a call on submission (it is like saying, OK, Ok, go and love others and I will be fine!).

Between going to Cairo, to England, to Nottingham, to Lancaster, to Scotforth (a long way...) two days ago, it crossed my mind that it is most probably the second interpretation; you may think that someone is great (when you love him of course, or may be without loving him (let us say also her) but what startles me (still) was this (....) tolerance, this submission, the (frightening) idea that you are aware that you are giving your heart to someone, only to put it in the washing machine and turn the dryer on.

Today, with another movement from Scotforth to Morecambe (still places inside England), the verse kept repeating in my mind like a refrain of a song; by the time I went home, I was under the influence of the line, literally bewitched, and whom can you resort to in these cases except Google?

Curious to know how is the poet?
yeah yeah..I understand :-)

Please check the link below; the poet happens to be from Egypt by the way (and I swear by Egypt...it is a matter of sheer coincidence!).

http://www.poetry-chaikhana.com/I/IbnalFaridUm/index.htm

You may like as well to check the music below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1488R7W6bTo

Hopefully, enjoy